OUR FUTURE DOOM: Oceans May Become More Corrosive Than When The Dinosaurs Died

February 21st, 2006 | researchmaterial

Increased carbon dioxide emissions are rapidly making the world’s oceans more acidic and, if unabated, could cause a mass extinction of marine life similar to one that occurred 65 million years ago when the dinosaurs disappeared. Ken Caldeira of the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology will present this research at the AGU/ASLO Ocean Sciences meeting in Honolulu, HI on Monday, Feb 20.

Caldeira’s computer models have predicted that the oceans will become far more acidic within the next century. Now, he has compared this data with ocean chemistry evidence from the fossil record, and has found some startling similarities. The new finding offers a glimpse of what the future might hold for ocean life if society does not drastically curb carbon dioxide emissions…


One Response to “OUR FUTURE DOOM: Oceans May Become More Corrosive Than When The Dinosaurs Died”

  1. “Ultimately, if we are not careful, our energy system could make the oceans corrosive”….”These results should help motivate the search for new energy sources”

    Should, could, maybe, potentially… sounds too if-y to me.

    I would suspect ulterior motives for most “research” anyway… plus, there is a constant cycle of extinction and discovery of new plants, animals, ext… the planet is constantly changing on its own… humans just assume that they are the most powerful force in the universe… who knows, this enviornmental devistation that we would like to take credit for, might brings about unforseen benefits, like curing boredom or gonorrhea…. I say, make everyday Doomsday.