Harvey Pekar’s Dead

July 12th, 2010 | comics talk

News story here.

All condolences to his daughter, who was delightful when I met her and Harvey.

Everyone told me Harvey was a crank. I thought he was funny as all hell. And a brilliant writer. Hugely sad day.


11 Responses to “Harvey Pekar’s Dead”

  1. My girlfriend works at the animal hospital that Harvey brought his diabetic cat into-she recently had the chance to meet him and said he was a very wonderful and sweet man, though a bit of a cranky bastard,a lesson in creative duality to be sure and a complete genius in the genre. He will be severely missed in the Cleveland area, god rest his soul.

  2. God fucking damnit. I know he was all beat up from cancer treatment, but still, dying 70 is unfair.

    He’d lately been producing these odd little comic book profiles of people he’d met, like a Vietnam vet he’d worked with and a borderline sociopath/genius. And himself, of course (“The Quitter”). I loved those things.

    Fucknuggets.

    I may have to hook up my VCR to watch my American Splendor tape.

  3. I think he will be missed across the world, i always found his work to be some of the most inspiring I have ever read.

  4. Hell of a tweet today you did, announcing his death. Yes, I know everyone must do that — go — but it still comes as a shock with every single one. I’ll never get used to it.

  5. The Onion’s A.V. Club has a good profile up:

    http://www.avclub.com/articles/rip-harvey-pekar,42985/

  6. Damn. I used to watch him wind up David Letterman, back in the era of ‘zines and Comics: Not Just For Kids Anymore. I’ll have to go dig up the movie now.

  7. […] @warrenellis: @RapturousGroovz http://www.warrenellis.com/?p=10045 […]

  8. He was very nice and polite when I met him.

  9. He branched out into doing a whole new genre of work at the end of his life. His books on the history of the SDS, his adaptation of Studs Terkel’s _Working_, his beautiful book on a war that didn’t happen, _Macedonia_ are a generous outpouring of a cranky and original mind.

    He will be missed but what he did provides a great example of what one determined individual can do.

  10. I got to meet him once at a screening for American Splendor. We talked about 4 or 5 different things in about 15 minutes, and he had solid, well-thought out opinions on every single one. He was interested in life, and wanted to understand it better and took as much of it in as he could, and I will always admire that.

  11. If only i were religious this loss could be tempered by the hope of seeing him in heaven. alas…