links for 2007-03-27

March 27th, 2007 | Uncategorized


20 Responses to “links for 2007-03-27”

  1. Making bestiality that much less a crime.

    Breathe a sigh of relief bible belt….the Lord works in mysterious ways.

  2. little and great fresh kill (the two streams) and the fresh killes estuary predate (in name) the existance of the landfill by about 300 years, a lingustic gift of the dutch inhabitants of manhattan.

    Fresh Kills the landfill is a fairly recent addition (1948) and at 2200 acres is the larget pile of junk ever erected by man, as well as the tallest artificial hill on the eastern seaboard.

  3. 15% human? That’s more than Cheney can say.

  4. Warren, “kill” is Dutch for “river” or “stream” or something like that. Hence, Fresh Kills (as unfortunately named as it is), is the Fresh River.

  5. I had the pleasure of growing up on Staten Island. It’s a great experience, growing up in a place that is defined by the World’s Biggest Landfill and the mall. As opposed to the place where the declaration of Independence was given to the British (thus ushering in the first Experiment Day).

    I can’t wait to see what Brian Wood does with it in DMZ.

  6. Sheep again. So much for the “living in a PKD world” concept. Fascinating.

  7. City Gent: But where did they get the idea from?
    Rustic : From Harold. He’s that sheep there over under the elm. He’s that most dangerous of animals, a clever sheep. He’s the ring-leader. He has realized that a sheep’s life consists of standing around for a few months and then being eaten. And that’s a depressing prospect for an ambitious sheep. He’s patently hit on the idea of escape.
    City Gent Well why don’t you just get rid of Harold?
    Rustic Because of the enormous commercial possibilities should he succeed.

  8. How many more percent before they can legally sell it as human meat…?

    Mmm….sweet, sweet humutton.

  9. The two sheep-related articles remind me of the trailer for “Black Sheep,” in which scientifically modified sheep start attacking people. There are hints of were-sheep in there, as well.

  10. Another fact:Fresh Kills dump is one of the few man-made structures visible from space.

  11. “lanolin-lubricated killing frenzy?” Why are the US papers so boring?!

  12. Unlike, say, the rest of New York city?

    Considering the balcony of my apartment is visible from space (I know because I’m looking at it right now), I have my doubts.

    Note to self: find out when satellites pass over and leave interesting easter eggs for Google Earthers and military analysts to find.

  13. I should have said “visible to the naked eye from space” In other words, an astronaut coul look out the window from orbit and see it on a clear day.

  14. I should have said “visible to the naked eye from space” In other words, an astronaut could look out the window from orbit and see it on a clear day.

  15. How long before a horror movie gets made with the premise being roads haunted by 9-11 ghosts whose remains are part of the asphalt?

  16. Good pub in Leighterton, worth fighting off a lanoline-lubricated killing frenzy

  17. RE: visible from space…

    The early apollo missions are where most observations about what was or wasn’t resolvable with the naked eye were made. mostly due to the being that first spacial photography the people saw on TV and the first american space walks, and the first missions where people had time to look out the window. corona project photographs wouldn’t declassified for decades… however the apollo missions achieved rather high orbits since they would mostly about laying the ground-work for the moon mission. apollo-4 for example reached an altitude of about 18,079 kilometers (geostationary is achieved at 35,876km above mean sea level)…

    The space shuttle however has a typical operating altitude of 300-500km, which is a vantage point you can see all sorts of stuff from, runways, the shadows of tall buildings, golf courses, hangars, freeways etc. At night over the pacific you can pick out the lights of individual ships including rather small ones with magnification.

  18. RE: visible from space…

    The early apollo missions are where most observations about what was or wasn’t resolvable with the naked eye were made. mostly due to the being that first spacial photography the people saw on TV and the first american space walks, and the first missions where people had time to look out the window. corona project photographs wouldn’t declassified for decades… however the apollo missions achieved rather high orbits since they would mostly about laying the ground-work for the moon mission. apollo-4 for example reached an altitude of about 18,079 kilometers (geostationary is achieved at 35,876km above mean sea level)…

    The space shuttle however has a typical operating altitude of 300-500km, which is a vantage point you can see all sorts of stuff from, runways, the shadows of tall buildings, golf courses, hangars, freeways etc. At night over the pacific you can pick out the lights of individual ships including rather small ones without magnification.

  19. I can´t tell if Warren posted this about the 9/11 debris because you are concerned or just poking fun, but honestly, they are kicking up a storm over the the “possability” that there “may” have been bone fragments that found a new life as road material. I hate to be the guy constantly saying “what about Iraq” but….”what the a-fucking-bout Iraq!?” I think they have some mislocated bone fragments there that you can have a hissy fit over.

  20. The neat part about the “Kill” thing is that over time, even people in the region generally forgot what “Kill” meant, resulting in some bodies of water being called things like (Whatever) Kill Creek.