Suddenly, Someone Realises That Metal Deposits May Not Last Forever

January 18th, 2006 | researchmaterial

Researchers studying supplies of copper, zinc and other metals have determined that these finite resources, even if recycled, may not meet the needs of the global population forever. According to the study, if all nations were to use the same services enjoyed in developed nations, even the full extraction of metals from the Earth’s crust and extensive recycling programs may not meet future demand…

(In other news, writer requests that planet’s name be changed from “Earth” to “Retard Club”.)


8 Responses to “Suddenly, Someone Realises That Metal Deposits May Not Last Forever”

  1. I find myself feeling genuinely greatful to the Chinese.

    Having someone else on the planet as greedy for resources as the U.S. is a well-needed whack on the side of the head.

    Of course, the neocons’ solution to shortages won’t be greater efficiency, radical recycling, or (so kill me) asteroid mining, but phuqing poor countries out of their boodle.

  2. The first rule of Retard Club: you do not talk about Retard Club.

  3. Paul Ehrlich (author of “The Population Bomb”) was saying this stuff 30 years ago. It’s not really new.

    Julian Simon challenged Ehrlich on this, and made a wager that over the following 10 years’ time, the prices of mined metals (actually, a market basket of 10 metals, chosen by Ehrlich) would go down (reflecting greater abundance) rather than up (reflecting increasing scarcity). The wager was accepted, and Ehrlich lost. The market prices of all those metals fell (after adjusting for monetary inflation). Simon then challenged Ehrlich to try again for another 10-year bet. Ehrlich wanted to change the terms (to include stuff like increasing concentrations of CO2 in the atmosphere), and Simon declined, knowing that would be a sucker bet.

    Simon’s dead now, I wonder who will step up to challenge this?

  4. Asteroid Mining or volcano mining, the geo-extraction technologies of the future. :)

    I’ve been telling people about Mars for years.

  5. I love being apart of the retard Club.

  6. Mars is a crappy place to get minerals.

    Low density (fewer valuable minerals), atmosphere and dust to fuck things up. Gravity well to get out of. Nights.

    Asteroids, maybe.

    I read that Ceres shows traces of having ice! That would be a big help. You could use it for rocket reaction mass, for life support, and industrial processes. Ceres’ slight gravity well would be easy to get out of, but might help with setting up refineries and such. (i.e., if you have just a little gravity, you can set up hoppers and chutes to contain and guide flows of materials you are processing.)

    I don’t know how dense Ceres is, but it would make a nice base for going after valuable asteroids.

    Too bad it is far from the sun.

  7. So your saying rush out and buy lots of shares in mining companies,

  8. Prediction: The United States will covertly de-orbit a succession of metal-rich asteroids into the terror hotbeds de jour. Once the dust has cleared (give it 50-60 years and a mini-ice age), we’ll be set!

    Now if you’ll excuse me, there’s a black helicopter at the do(*&$% ##CARRIER LOST##