On The Magic Of Press Release Writing

June 28th, 2011 | Work

So I came across this press release for the Marvel Anime stuff I wrote series outlines for.  I didn’t write scripts, just outlines that were adapted and expanded into scripts by Japanese writers.  From what little I’ve seen of the end result, there’s pretty much nothing of my work in them, and I’m not actually screen-credited in the Japanese releases.  Which is fair enough.  I got paid, and if they didn’t use the work, there’s no reason to give me a credit, right?

What struck me as odd was this, buried in the press release:

G4 is the exclusive U.S. television home of the four brand-new anime series, guided by New York Times best-selling author Warren Ellis

New York Times best-selling author?  I don’t think so.  When the hell did that happen?  I think I would have heard about that, right?  I’m already confused about my name being used in press releases when I’m not credited on the screen, but making shit up?  I presume this is the magic of PR that I hear about.

EDITED TO ADD: apparently the New York Times has a best-selling hardcover graphic novel list.  And Greg Pak has informed me that I appeared on it just once, with the $75 oversized hardcover ABSOLUTE PLANETARY 2 book.  One presumes it’s a dollar-number calculation rather than a unit-number count.  So I take it back, anonymous Marvel PR flack.  I did note on Twitter that I was surprised the NYT did such a thing, because I’ve seen book top the Diamond best-selling GNs list with 6000 sales, at which point Bendis said “don’t pull that string. The entirety of our world will unravel.”

And no, of course DC never mentioned anything about it to me.  Heh.


Picture Of The Day

June 28th, 2011 | photography

(from BMEnews)


Magnolia blossom after heavy rainstorm, New Orleans

June 28th, 2011 | photography

CONSTANT SIEGE

Magnolia blossom after heavy rainstorm, New Orleans

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The Economist | Neutrinos: Delta force (testing something!)

June 28th, 2011 | photography

The Economist

Neutrinos
A study of neutrinos may explain why things are made of matter, not antimatter

EVEN by the elevated standards of particle physics neutrinos are weird beasts. They travel within a whisker of the speed of light, have no electric charge, practically no mass and precious little will to interact with anything else. Billions penetrate every square centimetre of the Earth’s surface every second without so much as a quiver. This makes them rather hard to detect. So hard that Wolfgang Pauli, the Austrian physicist who postulated their existence in 1930, wagered a case of champagne that no one would ever do so. He lost the bet in 1956. Since then, neutrinos (of which there are now known to be three fundamentally different sorts) have allowed researchers to glimpse inside the sun, study exploding stars and examine the universe’s distant past.

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